Mary Medlicott, Storyteller and Author - Storyworks

Storytelling Starters ~ Recycling Revisited

This week, my hair began falling out in bundles. An early consequence of the chemo. Not nice! Seeing the devastation, turbans was the thought that promptly came to my mind. First, I got out what I thought was a suitable scarf, twisted it around my balding bonk, saw that it looked a terrible mess that might fall apart any minute. What to do?

How to do it?

Google provided the answer. Up came numerous videos of lovely young women taking barely a minute to create stylish turbans out of beautiful scarves. I tried again and now it became quick and easy for me too.

No more hairdresser visits:

So if and when we meet from now on, you’ll surely see me in a turban. Perhaps it will have to be my style for whatever is left of my life. Granted it’s a little bit time-consuming and cuts out the role of the hairdresser in my life. And since I’ve been going to the same hairdresser for almost half a century, that’s not nothing. But at least it deals with the hair-loss problem. Besides, turbans are different from hats. In my still small experience, they come out interestingly different each time.

From hat story to turban tale:

Twisting turbans round my head brought back to my mind a wickedly simple little story I used sometimes to tell to younger children. It’s the story of a hat that was blown off the head of its wearer when he was riding along on a horse. The hat ended up so high in the branches of a nearby tree that its owner had to leave it there. What happened to it?

Well, one answer is that up in that tree, the hat acquired a whole new life. When a pair of birds found it, it became their home. That year and the next year and even the year after that, that pair of birds raised whole broods of chicks in that new sort of nest.

My fantasies:

The hat story in turn got me fantasising about one of my turbans blowing away. Where might it end up? On the top of the spire of our local church? Perched on the top of Winston Churchill’s bald, bronze, statued head in Parliament Square? The possibilities are infinite. Presuming it stayed in shape long enough, it could even become a cause of speculation to tourists, walkers and casual passers-by. A turban up a tree? Why? What next?

PS: Paul felt obliged to take some photos of me in my first turban. The top picture is the one I liked best. As for the bottom pic, it may not immediately look like it but it’s a nest-full of baby birds with mouths wide open waiting for food.

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8 Responses to “Storytelling Starters ~ Recycling Revisited”

  1. Annalee Curran Says:

    Thanks to you, we shall ALL be wearing turbans now! You look splendid!

  2. Mary Medlicott Says:

    Perhaps I should open a turban shop. All best wishes, Mary

  3. Pam Says:

    Very stylish indeed!
    Best wishes, Mary,
    Pam

  4. Mary Medlicott Says:

    Thanks! All best wishes, Mary

  5. Julie Sperring Says:

    Hi Mary – I can totally imagine you scaling the creative heights of turban design and finding some really beautiful fabrics to use! You look lovely in the photo xx

  6. Mary Medlicott Says:

    Dear Julie, It’s great to know that, even from the other end of the world, my turban looks OK. Of course, it gives me a wonderful opportunity and incentive to purchase more scarves! Much love, Mary

  7. Karen Tovell Says:

    In your Urban Turban, Mary, you look very chic – or should that read ‘chick’ (in light of the second photo!!) It immediately put me in mind of the true story you told of how your treasured storytelling cloth was whipped by the wind out of your bag whilst walking through the streets of London and lost. A disaster for a storyteller!

    Sending you much love, as always.

  8. Mary Medlicott Says:

    Dear Karen, I loved getting your chic, chick pun. And thanks for your encouraging approval of my turban, also for remembering my story of my story cloth being whipped out of my bag and whirled away by the wind. The ups and downs of life, hey? But it’s always an up to have good friends. Much love, Mary

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